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Home : Media
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
14 October 2013
CONTACT:
Julie Adams, Director, Marketing and Communications
Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International
Julie@stti.iupui.edu
+1.317.634.8171
 
 
STTI authors demystify real-world health care simulation
Experts share how simulation can range from easy what-ifs to high-tech interactives
 
INDIANAPOLIS — Evidence suggests that using simulation to train health care providers improves outcomes not only for providers, but ultimately for patients, as well. Now, two leaders in health care have published a pragmatic, comprehensive yet easy-to-read handbook for designing and implementing successful simulation environments.
 
Published by the Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI), Mastering Simulation: A Handbook for Success offers highly practical examples, suggestions, and reflective questions that will appeal to health care professionals in both clinical and academic settings.
 
The most oft-quoted definition of simulation, by David M. Gaba of Stanford University, characterizes it as a technique — not a technology — for amplifying or replacing real experiences with guided ones that replicate substantial aspects of the real world in a fully interactive manner.
 
Echoing Gaba, authors of Mastering Simulation Beth Ulrich, EdD, RN, FACHE, FAAN, and Mary E. (Beth) Mancini, PhD, RN, NE-BC, FAHA, ANEF, FAAN, cover much more than what many health care professionals expect when they hear the word “simulation.”
 
“Simulation usually refers to human patient simulators used for clinical competency development or assessment. In reality, simulation can range from simple what-if calculations to highly sophisticated, high-fidelity models in very realistic hospital environments, with many other options available along the simulation continuum,” said Ulrich.
 
One of the biggest challenges in the industry is how to educate and train health care professionals without endangering patients.
 
“New practitioners enter their professions often without ever having seen, much less gotten experience with, such high-stakes situations as codes, trauma care, chest pain, or anaphylactic shock,” Ulrich said. “Simulation can give them that experience without risks.”
 
The book is available at www.nursingknowledge.org/sttibooks.
 
Mastering Simulation: A Handbook for Success by Beth Ulrich, EdD, RN, FACHE, FAAN, and Mary E. (Beth) Mancini, PhD, RN, NE-BC, FAHA, ANEF, FAAN
ISBN-13: 9781938835032 
Published by STTI, 2013
Price: US $49.95. Soft cover, 416 pages. Trim size: 7⅜ x 9⅛ inches
 
About the authors:
Beth Ulrich, EdD, RN, FACHE, FAAN, is senior partner, Innovative Health Resources, and editor of Nephrology Nursing Journal, the professional journal of the American Nephrology Nurses’ Association. Ulrich served as vice president of the hospital services division for a simulation technology education provider and has extensive senior executive experience as CNO, COO, and senior vice president in hospitals and large health care systems.
 
Beth Mancini, PhD, RN, NE-BC, FAHA, ANEF, FAAN, is professor, associate dean, and chair for undergraduate nursing programs at The University of Texas at Arlington College of Nursing, president of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare, and co-chair of the Education Task Force for the International Liaison Committee for Resuscitation. She is a past member of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada’s Simulation Task Force, Sigma Theta Tau International’s Simulation and Emerging Technologies Content Advisory Group, and the World Health Organization’s Initiative on Training and Simulation and Patient Safety.
 
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The Honor Society of Nursing, Sigma Theta Tau International (STTI) is a nonprofit organization whose mission is advancing world health and celebrating nursing excellence in scholarship, leadership, and service. Founded in 1922, STTI has more than 130,000 active members in more than 85 countries. Members include practicing nurses, instructors, researchers, policymakers, entrepreneurs and others. STTI’s 495 chapters are located at 677 institutions of higher education throughout Armenia, Australia, Botswana, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, England, Ghana, Hong Kong, Japan, Kenya, Malawi, Mexico, the Netherlands, Pakistan, Portugal, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Swaziland, Sweden, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand, the United States, and Wales. More information about STTI can be found online at www.nursingsociety.org.

 
 
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